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Arthur Miller

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Anarawd ap Rhodri (d. 916), king in Wales, was the son of Rhodri Mawr and Angharad ferch Meurig of Ceredigion. With the division of political power in north Wales on Rhodri's death at English hands in 878, later medieval sources credited Anarawd with either ...

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Bleddyn ap Cynfyn (d. 1075), king of Gwynedd and of Powys, was the son of Cynfyn ap Gwerystan, probably a nobleman from Powys, and Angharad, daughter of Maredudd ab Owain (d. 999), ruler of Deheubarth. According to English sources Edward the Confessor granted ...

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Brochfael Ysgithrog [Brochfael ap Cyngen] (supp. fl. 6th cent.), king of Powys, enjoys a reputation enhanced by his son Tysilio, the saint of Meifod. A poem ascribed to Taliesin is in praise of another son, Cynan Garwyn. A cycle of verses put into the mouth of ...

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Brychan Brycheiniog (fl. c. 500), king of Brycheiniog, was allegedly son of the Irish king Anlach, son of Coronac, and of Marchell ferch Dewdrig of south Wales. He was the legendary dynastic founder and eponym of the early medieval kingdom of Brycheiniog (Brecknockshire)...

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Cadell Ddyrnllug (fl. 5th cent.), king of Powys, was the legendary ancestor of the later ‘Cadelling’ kings of early medieval Powys in north-east and east Wales; his epithet means ‘gleaming hilt’. His parentage is unclear from the genealogical sources, though later genealogies (probably erroneously) render him grandson of the great ...

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Cadell ap Rhodri (d. 910), king in Wales, was one of the sons of Rhodri Mawr and Angharad ferch Feurig of Ceredigion. Although he is described as 'king' on his death in 910 and possibly had held that status since the demise of his father in 878, the exact location and extent of his ‘kingdom’ is not apparent. Later medieval accounts of the division of political power following ...

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Cadell ab Arthfael (d. 942), king of Gwent, was son of Arthfael ap Hywel of Gwent in south Wales. He ruled the kingdom of Gwent from perhaps about 916 until his death in 942. Little is known of his reign. He is mentioned twice in the ...

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See Rhys ap Gruffudd

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Cadfan ab Iago (fl. c. 616–c. 625), king of Gwynedd, was son of Iago ap Beli of Gwynedd. Cadfan seems to have ruled the kingdom of Gwynedd in north-west Wales during the early decades of the seventh century. Few facts concerning his reign or the extent of his power are known, and the details recounted by ...

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See Owain Gwynedd [Owain ap Gruffudd]

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Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon [called Cadwaladr Fendigaid] (d. 664/682), king of Gwynedd, was son of Cadwallon ap Cadfan of Gwynedd; the claim in late sources that his mother was a daughter of Pybba of Mercia is based on Geoffrey of Monmouth and is probably unhistorical. ...

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Cadwallon [C?dwalla] ap Cadfan (d. 634), king of Gwynedd, was the subject of two very different portraits. In Bede's Historia ecclesiastica he was 'the raging tyrant' and 'the unspeakable leader of the Britons' (Bede, Hist. eccl., 3.1); in an early Welsh poem in his praise he was the champion of the Britons against their oppressor, ...

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See Bleddyn ap Cynfyn

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Caradog ap Gruffudd ap Rhydderch (d. 1081), king in Wales, who in Upper Gwent (Gwent Uwchcoed) faced the Norman incursions in south-east Wales, was the representative of a dynasty first brought to prominence by Rhydderch ab Iestyn. The family had close links with ...

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See Caradog ap Gruffudd ap Rhydderch

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Cunedda (supp. fl. late 4th–mid-5th cent.), ruler in north Wales, is said to have led the migration of a section of his north British people from Manau in Gododdin, the area around the headwaters of the Forth still commemorated in Clackmannan, to north Wales...

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Cynan Garwyn (fl. c. 550–c. 600), king of Powys, was son of Brochfael Ysgithrog of Powys. Cynan ruled the kingdom of Powys in north-east and east Wales in the late sixth century. His epithet Garwyn or possibly Carwyn means either ‘of the White Thigh’ or ‘of the White Chariot’. Regarded by the later genealogists as one of the royal descendants of ...

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See Gruffudd ap Rhys

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Cynddylan ap Cyndrwyn (fl. c. 616–c. 641), king in Wales, was son of Cyndrwyn of Powys. He seems to have been an important ruler in the southern part of the kingdom of Powys during the middle decades of the seventh century. Knowledge of him and his dynasty is restricted almost exclusively to a series of elegiac poems composed perhaps no earlier than the ninth century, one of which takes the form of a eulogy by his sister ...

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Cyngen ap Cadell (d. 854/5), king of Powys, was the son of Cadell ap Brochfael (d. 808) of Powys. Cyngen ruled the kingdom of Powys in north-east and east Wales from 808, when his father died, until his own death in 854 or 855, or shortly before that date. He is the last known king of the ...