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?thelberht [St ?thelberht, Ethelbert] (779/80–794), king of the East Angles, was the son of King ?thelred of the East Angles and was executed in 794 by order of King Offa of Mercia, as a result of which he came to be regarded as a royal martyr. His cult, which probably started life as a focus for resistance to ...

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?thelberht (779/8080–794) coin ? Copyright The British Museum

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?thelthryth [St ?thelthryth, Etheldreda, Audrey] (d. 679), queen in Northumbria, consort of King Ecgfrith, and abbess of Ely, was the daughter of Anna, king of the East Angles (d. 654?). Her immediate kindred was dominated by women in religion, later venerated as saints, including three sisters, ...

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Alcuin [Albinus, Flaccus] (c. 740–804), abbot of St Martin's, Tours, and royal adviser, was a major figure in the revival of learning and letters under the Frankish king and emperor, Charlemagne (r. 768–814).

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Alcuin (c. 740–804) medallion drawing ? reserved

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Alfred [?lfred] (848/9–899), king of the West Saxons and of the Anglo-Saxons, was born at Wantage. He was the youngest of at least six children of King ?thelwulf of Wessex (d. 858) and of Osburh, daughter of Oslac, the king's butler (said to be descended from the family that founded the kingdom of the ...

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Alfred (848/99–899) silver penny, 871–99 ? Copyright The British Museum

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Balthild [St Balthild, Balthilda] (d. c. 680), queen of the Franks, consort of Clovis II of Neustria, was a Saxon, almost certainly born in England, probably in the early or mid-630s. She became a Frankish queen and founded the convent of Chelles, to which she retired during the last years of her life. There she was revered as a saint soon after her death. Her life, written before 690–91 by someone at ...

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Ceolwulf [St Ceolwulf] (d. 764), king of Northumbria, was a descendant of Ida, who had founded the kingdom of Bernicia (the northern part of Northumbria) in 547; but, whereas until 716 the only members of Ida's family to have reigned in Northumbria...

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Charles I (1600–1649), king of England, Scotland, and Ireland, was born in Dunfermline Castle, Scotland, on 19 November 1600 and baptized at the palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh, on 23 December. He was the third child of James VI of Scotland (subsequently James I...

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Charles I (1600–1649) by Sir Anthony Van Dyck, 1635 The Royal Collection ? 2004 HM Queen Elizabeth II

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Eadwine [St Eadwine, Edwin] (c. 586–633), king of Northumbria, was the son of ?lla, king of Deira, and the fifth of the seven overkings named by Bede. His life, as recorded in vivid and detailed anecdotes by both Bede and the author of the ...

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Ealhmund [St Ealhmund] (d. 800), prince and martyr, is the subject of a passio (account of martyrdom) preserved only in the fourteenth-century manuscript in the Gotha Forschungsbibliothek (MS I.81). This text, which is utterly unreliable, presents him as the son of Aldfrith, king of Northumbria...

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Eanfl?d [St Eanfl?d] (b. 626, d. after 685), queen in Northumbria, consort of King Oswiu, was the daughter of Eadwine (d. 633), king in Northumbria, and his wife, the Kentish princess ?thelburh (d. 647). Born on Easter eve (19 April) 626, she was baptized by ...

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Edmund [St Edmund] (d. 869), king of the East Angles, was venerated as a saint soon after his death at the hands of vikings. According to numismatic evidence, Edmund succeeded King ?thelweard. The number of coins issued in Edmund's name indicates that he reigned for several years, but the only fact known about him from contemporary writings is in the ...

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Edward [St Edward; called Edward the Martyr] (c. 962–978), king of England, was the son of Edgar, who died on 8 July 975.

Nothing is known of the cause of ...

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Edward [St Edward; known as Edward the Confessor] (1003x5–1066), king of England, known as ‘the Confessor’ after his canonization in 1161, was born between 1003 and 1005 at Islip, near Oxford. He was the seventh son of King ?thelred II, but the first from his father's second marriage, to ...

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Edward [St Edward; Edward the Martyr] (c. 962–978) coin ? Copyright The British Museum

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Edward [St Edward; Edward the Confessor] (1003x55–1066) embroidery (Bayeux Tapestry) [seated, centre] by special permission of the City of Bayeux

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Gwynllyw [St Gwynllyw, Woolloos] (fl. 6th cent.), king of Glywysing, became, after a religious conversion, patron saint and founder of St Woolloos, Newport. His vita, probably of the early twelfth century, has a triple function: first, it sets out a model of the good king; second, it is a story of a conversion from worldly power and riches to monastic asceticism, so written as to proclaim the saintly status both of ...