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Henry Beaufort (1375?–1447) stone effigy ? English Heritage. NMR

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Beaufort, Henry [called the Cardinal of England] (1375?–1447), bishop of Winchester and cardinal, was the second of four illegitimate children of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster (1340–1399), and Katherine Swynford (1350?–1403), daughter of the Hainaulter Sir Payn Roelt, who was governess to the duke's children [...

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Blois, Henry de (c. 1096–1171), bishop of Winchester, was the fourth and youngest son of étienne, count of Blois, and Adela, daughter of William I.

The dates of birth of all the children of ...

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Henry de Blois (c. 1096–1171) seal [obverse] The British Library

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Cormac mac Cuilennáin (d. 908), king of Munster and bishop, belonged to one of the lesser branches of the éoganacht and his assumption of the kingship of Munster seems likely to have been a compromise arrangement (Byrne, 214, 292). It is likely that his marriage to ...

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Farnham, Nicholas of (d. 1257), royal doctor and bishop of Durham, was a native of the south of England, probably of Farnham in Surrey. It is likely that he was born in the reign of Henry II, and before 1200 had started his academic career at ...

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Geoffrey (d. 1093), bishop of Coutances and magnate, belonged to the energetic and warlike baronage of western Normandy who did so much to restore the Norman church after the viking raids and civil wars of the tenth and early eleventh centuries, and were among the most prominent counsellors and supporters of ...

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Odo, earl of Kent (d. 1097), bishop of Bayeux and magnate, was the son of Herluin de Conteville (d. c.1066), a Norman magnate of vicomte status who held lands around Grestain to the south of the Seine estuary, and of Herleva (...

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Odo, earl of Kent (d. 1097) embroidery (Bayeux Tapestry) [seated, third from right] by special permission of the City of Bayeux

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Wimund (fl. c. 1130–c. 1150), bishop of the Isles and pretender, is unquestionably one of the most enigmatic figures of twelfth-century Scottish history. His story is related in its fullest form by the English chronicler William of Newburgh, who claims to have spoken personally with him. According to ...

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Winchcombe, Tideman [Robert Tydman] (d. 1401), courtier and bishop of Worcester, is alleged to have become a detested intimate of Richard II in that king's final years. However, his personality and influence lie hidden behind the sketchiest of recorded careers. Even his name poses problems. The ...